Our native wildflowers - page 20

Wake-robin trillium
(Trillium erectum)
 ©Janet Allen Trillium

This isn't what people think of when they think of trillium, but trillium it is. A nice contrast to the white-flowered variety.

Wildlife: Berries for birds, mammals
More info from Wildflower Center

Great white trillium
(Trillium grandiflorum)
 ©Janet Allen Trillium

The iconic spring flower. I try to verify as much as possible that whoever sells this plant is selling it legitimately, i.e. not digging it from the woods. I hesitate even to purchase it from people selling it from their own woods, which obviously is legal, but is it ethical? It can be grown from seed, but it takes quite a few years. People have also been experimenting with tissue culture. If I see this for sale cheap, it's likely to have been harvested illegally, and I don't buy it.

Wildlife: Insects
More info from Wildflower Center

Great white trillium
(Trillium grandiflorum)
 ©Janet Allen Trillium

"I've already been pollinated!" This is the message the pinkish color sends to bees so they can move on to other trillium blooms not yet pollinated.

Bill Cullina has a detailed factsheet on How to start new trilliums from seed

Spreading globeflower
(Trollius laxus ssp. laxus)
 ©Janet Allen Globeflower

We bought this buttercup-relative at Garden in the Woods. We're looking forward to seeing the pale yellow flowers next year. It's a rare species, much more common before Europeans arrived in this country.

More info from Wildflower Center

Large merrybells
(Uvularia grandiflora)
 ©Janet Allen Bellwort

A very elegant plant with drooping yellow flowers. It's thriving and getting larger, but I haven't noticed it spreading at all. Darn! When I get a chance, I'm going to try dividing it in the fall.

More info from Wildflower Center

Blue vervain
(Verbena hastata)
 ©Janet Allen Blue vervain

I bought both V. hastata and V. stricta (Hoary vervain) at the same time. One died out or was "misplaced," i.e. I lost track of it and may have pulled it out. I believe V. hastata is what I have left. It volunteers quite well, but not so much as to be a nuisance. I like the tall, candelabra-like blue flowers.

Wildlife: Bees, butterflies, birds
Larval host: Common buckeye
** SPECIAL VALUE TO NATIVE BEES **
More info from Wildflower Center

New York ironweed
(Vernonia noveboracensis)
 ©Janet Allen NY ironweed

This has beautifully intense magenta flowers. The plant is rather tall, and the leaves are rather coarse. I've experimented with cutting some back in June, and it works well—the plants are shorter and bushier and have at least as many flowers. Of course, this delays flowering, so I'll leave one or two plants to attain their full height and provide nectar sooner.

Wildlife: Seeds for birds, nectar for butterflies
** SPECIAL VALUE TO NATIVE BEES **
More info from Wildflower Center

Culver's root
(Veronicastrum virginicum)
 ©Janet Allen Culver's root

This is one of my favorite plants. I'm hoping to get a patch of them rather than having just a few sprinkled here and there.

Wildlife: Butterflies, bees
** SPECIAL VALUE TO NATIVE BEES **
** Attracts predatory or parasatoid insects that prey upon pest insects **
More info from Wildflower Center

Culver's root
(Veronicastrum virginicum)
 ©Janet Allen Culver's root leaves

I especially like the foliage. The leaves are arranged in groups of six around the stem in a very architectural style.