Some of our bird visitors - Page 9

The numbers indicate the most individual birds of a species that I saw at the same time (to avoid double counting). A blank space represent months I didn't count, and a dot indicates I didn't see that species that month.

Red-winged blackbird
(Agelaius phoenceus)
 ©Janet Allen Red-winged blackbird

These blackbirds are infrequent visitors and not nearly as annoying as grackles.

See Cornell's All About Birds info on red-winged blackbirds.

YR J F M A M J J A S O N D
15     · · · · · · · · ·  
14     1 · · · · · · · ·  
13     · 2 1 · · · · · ·  
12     · · · · · · · · 2  
11 · · 30 · · · · · · 1 ·  
10 · · · · · · · · · · · ·
09 · · · 1 · · · · · · · ·
08 · · · · · · · · · · · ·
07 · · 12 · · · · · · · · ·
06 · · · · · · · · · · · ·
05 · · · · · · · · · · · ·
04 · · 4 · · · · · · · · ·
03 · · · · · · · · · · · ·
02 · · · 1 1 · · · · · · ·
01 · · ·             · · ·
Red-winged blackbird female
(Agelaius phoenceus)
 ©Janet Allen Redwing blackbird female

I think this is the female redwing blackbird. It's amazing how different the genders can look in some birds when they're so alike in others.

Common grackle
(Quiscalus quiscula)
 ©Janet Allen Common grackle

Unlike starlings and house sparrows, these are native birds—but even so, I find them to be very unpleasant. They're usually travel in loud and raucous groups, have an unpleasant voice, and I think they probably scare other birds away from our yard. They do have a nice irridescent coloring on their head.

NOTE: The "250" in 2015 is not a typo!

See Cornell's All About Birds info on common grackles.

YR J F M A M J J A S O N D
15     2 4 4 2 2 3 250 · ·  
14     26 6 4 2 3 5 · · ·  
13     50 6 4 8 4 3 · 3 ·  
12     · 3 3 3 7 20 1 3 1  
11 · 4 6 2 3 1 · 1 · · ·  
10 · · 1 1 2 · 4 · · · · ·
09 · · 30 13 3 1 2 5 · · 1 ·
08 · · 50 4 5 1 2 15 1 · · ·
07 · · 40 50 5 1 · 6 2 · · ·
06 · · 30 12 7 6 12 2 · 1 · ·
05 · · 30 10 8 2 4 4 · 1 · ·
04 · · 8 50 4 12 3 9 · 1 · ·
03 · · 11 15 5 8 10 3 · · · ·
02 · · 6 12 7 15 6 3 2 · 1 ·
01 · · 23             · 1 ·
Brown-headed cowbird
(Molothrus ater)
 ©Janet Allen Brown-headed cowbird

My heart always sinks when I see cowbirds. (The female is on the left; male on the right.) They're native, but our human pattern of development—especially cutting roads through forests—creates many more "edges" where cowbirds can thrive. Other native birds who haven't co-evolved with cowbirds in their previous range are now at risk. (More...)

See Cornell's All About Birds info on brown-headed cowbirds.

YR J F M A M J J A S O N D
15     · 2 2 3 · 1 1 · ·  
14     · 4 · 2 1 · · · ·  
13     · 2 1 · 2 · · · ·  
12     1 2 1 1 4 · · · ·  
11 · · · · 1 · · · · · 1  
10 · · · 1 3 · · · · · · ·
09 · · · 2 · · · 1 · · · ·
08 · · · 2 · 2 1 1 · · 3 ·
07 · · 1 2 1 1 · · · · · 1
06 · · · 2 2 · 2 1 · · 1 ·
05 · · · 1 3 1 · · · · · ·
04 · · · 1 2 3 1 · · · · ·
03 · · · 1 1 2 · · · · · ·
02 · · · 1 1 3 · · · · · ·
01 · · ·             · · ·
Baltimore oriole
(Icterus galbula)
 ©Janet Allen Baltimore oriole

It's always exciting to see the Baltimore oriole. It seems like I always see him in the redbud tree and that the redbud tree is in bloom when he comes. Most of my photos show him there. He never seems to stay very long though. In 2013, we were surprised to see the female gathering nesting materials in our yard, stripping fibers from the previous year's milkweed stalks.

See Cornell's All About Birds info on Baltimore orioles.

YR J F M A M J J A S O N D
15     · · · · · 1 · · ·  
14     · · 1 · · · · · ·  
13     · · 1 · · 1 · · ·  
12     · · · · · · · · ·  
11 · · · · 1 · · · · · ·  
10 · · · · 1 · · · · · · ·
09 · · · · · 1 · · · · · ·
08 · · · · · · · · · · · ·
07 · · · · 1 · · · · · · ·
06 · · · · · · · · · · · ·
05 · · · · 1 · · · · · · ·
04 · · · · · 1 1 · · · · ·
03 · · · · 1 · · · · · · ·
02 · · · · · · · · · · · ·
01 · · ·             · · ·
House finch
(Carpodacus mexicanus)
 ©Janet Allen House finch

There are fewer of these birds since the house finch eye disease hit. Years ago we often had them nesting in our door wreath, in our hanging baskets, and other places around the house, but now we rarely see them nesting. On the other hand, they actually aren't native here anyway, having been introduced by pet stores. Maybe fewer house finches will make it easier on other native birds.

See Cornell's All About Birds info on house finches.

YR J F M A M J J A S O N D
15     3 2 3 2 3 2 · 5 2  
14     2 4 2 2 4 · 1 1 ·  
13     3 3 1 · · · · · ·  
12     · 1 2 1 1 1 · · ·  
11 2 2 2 3 1 1 · · · · ·  
10 2 3 3 2 3 · 3 · · 4 3 2
09 3 6 6 3 1 1 1 1 · 1 3 4
08 9 12 5 3 3 4 2 4 4 3 12 3
07 27 10 5 9 2 2 2 1 2 2 15 28
06 26 12 3 3 3 3 2 2 · 4 6 18
05 13 8 7 6 2 3 1 3 1 9 4 4
04 · 2 2 4 2 2 2 1 · 2 4 15
03 · · 2 5 2 4 3 2 1 1 1 1
02 · · 2 4 8 7 5 2 2 2 1 ·
01 · · 2             · 1 ·
House finch - female
(Carpodacus mexicanus)
 ©Janet Allen House finch

The male and female often feed together at the feeder: one turned in one direction, the other in the opposite direction.

Purple finch
(Carpodacus purpureus)
 ©Janet Allen Purple finch

Although these are theoretically difficult to distinguish from house finches, when you see them, they're unmistakably more colorful. Check out the vivid color on the purple finch compared with the brownish stripes on the house finch.

See Cornell's All About Birds info on purple finches.

YR J F M A M J J A S O N D
15     · · 3 2 1 · · · ·  
14     · 1 · · · · · · ·  
13     · 3 1 1 · 1 · · 2  
12     · · · · · · · · ·  
11 · · · · · · · · · · ·  
10 · · · · · · · · · · · ·
09 · · · · · · · · · · · ·
08 · · · · · · · · · · · ·
07 · · · · · · · · · · · ·
06 · · · 2 · · · · · · · ·
05 · · · 2 · · · · · · · ·
04 · · · · · 1 · · · · · ·
03 · · · · · · · · · · · ·
02 · · · · · · · · · · · ·
01 · · ·             · · ·
Purple finch - female
(Carpodacus purpureus)
 ©Janet Allen Purple finch

It's a bit easier to distinguish the female house finch from the female purple finch than it is to distinguish between the males.