Some of our bird visitors - page 5

The numbers indicate the most individual birds of a species that I saw at the same time (to avoid double counting). A blank space represent months I didn't count, and a dot indicates I didn't see that species that month.

Northern mockingbird
(Mimus polyglottos)
 ©Janet Allen Northern mockingbird

A winter visitor to our yard, the mockingbird generally sits in the winterberry, defending it against the robin. They're very territorial! The mockingbird has a very elegant shape. Since it's here mostly during the months we're stuck inside I don't get to hear it "mocking" other birds, though its supposed to be quite a good mimic—better than the catbird.

See Cornell's All About Birds info on northern mockingbirds.

YR J F M A M J J A S O N D
15     · · · · · · · 1f ·  
14     · · · · · · 1 · ·  
13     · · · · · · · 1 1  
12     1 · · · · · 1 · 1  
11 2 1 1 · · · · 2 · 1 1  
10 1 · · · · · · · · 1 1 1
09 1 · · · · · · · · 1 · 1
08 · · · · · · · · · · · ·
07 · · · · · · · · · · · ·
06 1 · · · · · · · · · · ·
05 · · · · · · · · · 1 · 1
04 · · · · · · · · · · · ·
03 1 1 · 2 · · · · · · 1 ·
02 · · · 1 · · · · · · · 1
01 · · ·             · · ·
European starling
(Sturnus vulgaris)
 ©Janet Allen European starling

A real plague. Every starling in the yard represents many, many native birds that would be here otherwise. They not only take a lot of food—both natural and from our bird feeders—but they also take over nesting places. Note: They and house sparrows are not legally protected as are other native birds.

See Cornell's All About Birds info on European starlings.

YR J F M A M J J A S O N D
15     4 4 4 2 1 1 · · ·  
14     20 4 6 4 5 2 1 10 ·  
13     8 4 4 5 6 15 · 5 20  
12     7 5 5 5 3 2 2 1 ·  
11 7 2 2 3 3 8 · 2 · 1 ·  
10 3 13 4 3 6 · · · · · 1 30
09 10 5 6 3 3 9 · · · · · 3
08 · 10 12 3 3 5 · · · · 150 1
07 8 20 9 100 1 3 · · · · 1 ·
06 1 4 2 3 3 2 1 2 · 2 8 90
05 · 11 4 4 5 11 4 · · · · 2
04 4 2 1 1 6 8 15 · · · · 30
03 15 9 7 3 3 3 80 1 · · 1 60
02 50 50 2 1 8 15 25 5 · · · 80
01 4 7 17             · · ·
Cedar waxwing
(Bombycilla cedrorum)
 ©Janet Allen Cedar waxwing

A beautiful bird. These always look more like a painting than a real bird. Their coloring seems just too perfect. They're generally here in at least a small flock, which announces itself with an unusual twittering sound. They love berries of all kinds.

See Cornell's All About Birds info on cedar waxwings.

YR J F M A M J J A S O N D
15     · · 2 2 2 2 · 1 ·  
14     · 25 · 3 2 3 · · ·  
13     · · 9 4 2 6 · 1 ·  
12     · · 2 3 2 · · · 4  
11 3 · 4 12 3 2 · · · · ·  
10 · · · · · · 2 · · · 2 1
09 · · · 1 3 2 3 3 1 · · ·
08 · · · 2 · 1 · 1 · · · ·
07 · · · 11 · · 1 3 1 · 8 ·
06 · 5 · 9 · 2 3 3 · 3 10 ·
05 · 26 · · · 2 2 1 · · · ·
04 · · · 9 · 2 4 4 · · · ·
03 · · · 12 12 7 · · · · · ·
02 · · · · 12 1 · · · · · ·
01 · · ·             · · ·
Common yellowthroat
(Geothlypis trichas)
 ©Janet Allen Common yellowthroat

Along with the yellow warbler, this is the warbler I've seen most often. This is the very distinctive male bird.

See Cornell's All About Birds info on common yellowthroats.

YR J F M A M J J A S O N D
15     · · · · · · · · ·  
14     · · 1 · · 1 1 · ·  
13     · · 1 · · · 2 · ·  
12     · 1 · · · 1 1 · ·  
11 · · · · · · · · · · ·  
10 · · · · 1 · · · 1 · · ·
09 · · · · · · · 1 · · · ·
08 · · · · · · · · 1 · · ·
07 · · · · · · · · 1 · · ·
06 · · · · 1 · · · 1 · · ·
05 · · · · 1 · · · · 1 · ·
04 · · · · · · · · · 2 · ·
03 · · · · 1 · · · · 1 · ·
02 · · · · · · · · · · · ·
01 · · ·             · · ·
Common yellowthroat
(Geothlypis trichas)
 ©Janet Allen Common yellowthroat

I'd guess that this is a fall immature male.

Common yellowthroat
(Geothlypis trichas)
 ©Janet Allen Common yellowthroat female

This (confirmed by a more expert birder than I) is a fall immature female.

American redstart, female
(Setophaga ruticilla)
 ©Janet Allen American redstart

I first mistook this very active, small bird for a kinglet. But when I looked at the photos I had managed to snap, it had much more gold on its wings and sides of the breast than the kinglets have.

Once again, Merlin came to the rescue! I found that it was one of those tricky IDs—a female (or maybe an immature male?) that doesn't look like the redstart I usually see in books, which is the male.

See Cornell's All About Birds info on American redstarts.

YR J F M A M J J A S O N D
15     · · · · · · 1 · ·  
14     · · · · · 2 · · ·  
13     · · · · · · · · ·  
12     · · · · · · · · ·  
11 · · · · · · · · · · ·  
10 · · · · · · · · · · · ·
09 · · · · · · · · · · · ·
08 · · · · · · · · · · · ·
07 · · · · · · · · · · · ·
06 · · · · · · · · · · · ·
05 · · · · 1 · · · · · · ·
04 · · · · · · · · · · · ·
03 · · · · · · · · · · · ·
02 · · · · · · · · · · · ·
01 · · ·             · · ·
Cape May warbler
(Dendroica tigrina)
 ©Janet Allen Cape May warbler

One of a more recent sighting. It's exciting to see that after all these years, I still am seeing new species of warblers.

See Cornell's All About Birds info on Cape May warblers.

YR J F M A M J J A S O N D
15     · · · · · · · · ·  
14     · · 1 · · · · · ·  
13     · · · · · · · · ·  
12     · · · · · · · · ·  
11 · · · · · · · · · · ·  
10 · · · · · · · · · · · ·
09 · · · · · · · · · · · ·
08 · · · · · · · · · · · ·
07 · · · · · · · · · · · ·
06 · · · · · · · · · · · ·
05 · · · · · · · · · · · ·
04 · · · · · · · · · · · ·
03 · · · · · · · · · · · ·
02 · · · · · · · · · · · ·
01 · · ·             · · ·
Northern Parula
(Setophaga americana)
 ©Janet Allen Northern parula

I couldn't believe I saw this rare bird in my yard! If I had known, I would have been much more diligent about getting a good photo, but as it was I just saw some unusual movement in the shrubs and snapped a few pictures to examine later.

I was glad I was able to confirm the sighting at a meeting of the Cayuga Audubon Society when I was there giving a presentation on pollinators.

See Cornell's All About Birds info on Norther parula warblers.

YR J F M A M J J A S O N D
15     · · 1 · · · · · ·  
14     · · · · · · · · ·  
13     · · · · · · · · ·  
12     · · · · · · · · ·  
11 · · · · · · · · · · ·  
10 · · · · · · · · · · · ·
09 · · · · · · · · · · · ·
08 · · · · · · · · · · · ·
07 · · · · · · · · · · · ·
06 · · · · · · · · · · · ·
05 · · · · · · · · · · · ·
04 · · · · · · · · · · · ·
03 · · · · · · · · · · · ·
02 · · · · · · · · · · · ·
01 · · ·             · · ·
Magnolia warbler
(Dendroica magnolia)
 ©Janet Allen Magnolia warbler

Beautiful in its mature plumage.

See Cornell's All About Birds info on magnolia warblers.

YR J F M A M J J A S O N D
15     · · · · · 1 2 · ·  
14     · · 1 · · · 1 · ·  
13     · · · · · · · · ·  
12     · · · · · · · · ·  
11 · · · · · · · 2 · · ·  
10 · · · · · · · · · · · ·
09 · · · · · · · · · · · ·
08 · · · · · · · · · · · ·
07 · · · · · · · · · · · ·
06 · · · · · · · · · · · ·
05 · · · · · · · · · · · ·
04 · · · · · · · · · · · ·
03 · · · · · · · · · · · ·
02 · · · · · · · · · · · ·
01 · · ·             · · ·
Magnolia warbler
(Dendroica magnolia)
 ©Janet Allen Magnolia warbler

Two of these very active birds were flitting about the pear tree during fall migration.

Bay-breasted warbler
(Dendroica castanea)
 ©Janet Allen Baysided warbler

After looking through the Stokes Warbler book, I'm pretty sure this is the correct ID. Here it's in the clethra beside the stream where I spot most of the warblers.

See Cornell's All About Birds info on bay-breasted warblers.

YR J F M A M J J A S O N D
15     · · · · · · · · ·  
14     · · · · · · · · ·  
13     · · · · · · · · ·  
12     · · · · · · · · ·  
11 · · · · 1 · · · · · ·  
10 · · · · · · · · · · · ·
09 · · · · · · · · · · · ·
08 · · · · · · · · · · · ·
07 · · · · 1 · · · · · · ·
06 · · · · · · · · · · · ·
05 · · · · · · · · · · · ·
04 · · · · · · · · · · · ·
03 · · · · · · · · · · · ·
02 · · · · · · · · · · · ·
01 · · ·             · · ·