Some of our bird visitors - Page 10

The numbers indicate the most individual birds of a species that I saw at the same time (to avoid double counting). A blank space represent months I didn't count, and a dot indicates I didn't see that species that month.

White-winged crossbill
(Loxia leucoptera)
 ©Janet Allen White-winged crossbill

We've only seen this one once. A very unusual bird. This was one I had to send in to Cornell to confirm identification. (This isn't a very good photo since it was taken through the screen of my kitchen window.)

See Cornell's All About Birds info on white-winged crossbills.

YR J F M A M J J A S O N D
15     · · · · · · · · ·  
14     · · · · · · · · ·  
13     · · · · · · · · ·  
12     · · · · · · · · ·  
11 · · · · · · · · · · ·  
10 · · · · · · · · · · · ·
09 · · · · · · · · · · · ·
08 · · · 1 · · · · · · · ·
07 · · · · · · · · · · · ·
06 · · · · · · · · · · · ·
05 · · · · · · · · · · · ·
04 · · · · · · · · · · · ·
03 · · · · · · · · · · · ·
02 · · · · · · · · · · · ·
01 · · ·             · · ·
Common redpoll
(Carduelis flammea)
 ©Janet Allen Common redpoll

We don't often see these, but it's nice when they visit. This is the female.

See Cornell's All About Birds info on common redpolls.

YR J F M A M J J A S O N D
15     · · · · · · · · ·  
14     · · · · · · · · ·  
13     · · · · · · · · ·  
12     · · · · · · · · ·  
11 · · · · · · · · · · ·  
10 · · · · · · · · · · · ·
09 · · · · · · · · · · · ·
08 · · 1 3 · · · · · · · ·
07 · · · · · · · · · · · ·
06 · · · · · · · · · · · ·
05 · · · · · · · · · · · ·
04 · · · · · · · · · · · ·
03 · · · · · · · · · · · ·
02 · · · · · · · · · · · ·
01 · · ·             · · ·
Common redpoll
(Carduelis flammea)
 ©Janet Allen Common redpoll

This is the male.

Pine siskin
(Carduelis pinus)
 ©Janet Allen Pine siskin

One of the "irruptive" species—either a feast or a famine of them. One year we had a huge flock of about 70 birds; other years we have none. At first it was tricky to identify them, but now I just look for the house finch-looking bird with the yellowish tinge.

See Cornell's All About Birds info on pine siskins.

YR J F M A M J J A S O N D
15     · · · · · · · · ·  
14     · · · · · · · 1 ·  
13     · 2 7 · · · · · ·  
12     · · · · · · · · ·  
11 · · 3 · · · · · · · ·  
10 · · · · · · · · · 8 · ·
09 30 50 39 70 21 · · · · · · ·
08 · · · · 7 · · · · · · 6
07 · · · · · · · · · · · ·
06 · · · · · · · · · · · ·
05 · · · · · · · · · 2 · ·
04 · · · · · · · · · · · ·
03 · · · · · · · · · · · ·
02 · · · · 7 · · · · · · ·
01 · · ·             · · ·
American goldfinch
(Carduelis tristis)
 ©Janet Allen American goldfinch

It's here all year, though some people think it returns in the spring. It's hard to believe that such a brilliantly-colored bird could be missed. But in winter, it's in its dull winter garb, gobbling up nyger seed.

See Cornell's All About Birds info on American goldfinches.

YR J F M A M J J A S O N D
15     · 4 5 3 2 2 8 8 2  
14     3 4 5 4 3 5 10 10 1  
13     2 9 8 3 2 2 6 4 10  
12     5 5 2 3 2 2 7 2 6  
11 6 25 9 3 4 2 · 2 2 30 3  
10 42 31 16 5 4 1 2 2 2 1 6 5
09 50 8 5 4 2 3 3 5 3 5 25 28
08 18 35 28 4 3 6 3 2 10 10 20 30
07 18 7 3 6 3 2 2 2 6 2 1 11
06 3 1 7 15 5 2 2 6 10 8 6 7
05 30 45 20 12 14 2 1 8 25 6 1 1
04 70 70 50 14 8 8 4 2 50 50 60 30
03 · 1 · 3 7 4 7 10 20 21 18 22
02 · · · 2 9 9 3 2 13 8 1 ·
01 1 · 5             3 2 ·
American goldfinch
(Carduelis tristis)
 ©Janet Allen Goldfinch changing

Here the goldfinch is molting and donning its summer feathers. Some people mistakenly believe that the goldfinches (or "wild canaries") are returning. They've been here all along, though, but in their drab winter attire.

Their colors are best when they have a healthy diet, and females judge the males on the basis of the goldest gold and the largest, blackest caps.

More info in a nice article For Wildlife Watchers: American Goldfinch

American goldfinch
(Carduelis tristis)
 ©Janet Allen Goldfinch in winter

Here's its winter appearance. Goldfinches like many natural sources of seed, such as this hyssop.

House sparrow
(Passer domesticus)
 ©Janet Allen House sparrow

This non-native bird, like the European starling, is a true plague. Besides eating up all our bird seed, they chase other birds away by ganging up on them, taking over nesting sites, and destroying eggs or nestlings of native birds. It's actually a weaver finch, not a true sparrow. It's unfortunate that it's called a sparrow because true sparrows are very nice birds.

See Cornell's All About Birds info on house sparrows.

YR J F M A M J J A S O N D
15     5 4 6 5 35 50 30 15 10  
14     13 12 6 30 30 30 20 35 25  
13     8 8 4 3 9 15 30 20 35  
12     6 5 3 5 20 25 20 20 35  
11 30 20 15 6 5 · · · 30 30 40  
10 20 15 7 4 6 3 4 · 1 10 30 30
09 8 8 7 5 3 5 30 40 40 20 30 14
08 30 15 10 5 4 10 3 40 30 20 25 20
07 30 20 10 10 6 6 20 40 50 30 50 60
06 80 90 40 7 6 5 35 50 70 50 70 50
05 80 70 50 12 9 6 25 90 90 90 90 90
04 40 50 40 15 12 30 40 80 50 50 90 60
03 40 40 45 25 7 20 30 80 90 90 90 55
02 70 75 60 40 10 8 25 80 80 30 80 60
01 80 80 80             50 60 65
House sparrow
(Passer domesticus)
 ©Janet Allen House sparrow

The female house sparrow. Read more about house sparrows...