Some of our bird visitors - page 1

The numbers indicate the most individual birds of a species that I saw at the same time (to avoid double counting). A blank space represent months I didn't count, and a dot indicates I didn't see that species that month.

Mallard
(Anas platyrhynchos)
 ©Janet Allen Mallard

Every few years we have a pair of mallard ducks spend an hour or two in our ponds. There's not enough food or space for them to stay, but it's interesting while they're here (as long as they don't eat our tadpoles!)

See Cornell's All About Birds info on mallards.

YR J F M A M J J A S O N D
15     · · · · · · · · ·  
14     2 2 2 · · · · · ·  
13     · · 2 · · · · · ·  
12     · 2 · · · · · · ·  
11 · · · · 2 · · · · · ·  
10 · · · · · · · · · · · ·
09 · · · · · · · · · · · ·
08 · · · · · · · · · · · ·
07 · · · · · · · · · · · ·
06 · · · · · · · · · · · ·
05 · · · · 2 · · · · · · ·
04 · · · · · · · · · · · ·
03 · · · · · · · · · · · ·
02 · · · · · · · · · · · ·
01 · · ·             · · ·
Wild turkey
(Meleagris gallopavo)
 ©Janet Allen Turkey

We had a small flock of turkeys stroll through our yard a few years ago. There are turkeys about a mile away in an undeveloped area; I don't know how they made their way to our yard. I don't expect we'll see them often or ever again. This is the only photo I managed to get, showing one of them flying away.

See Cornell's All About Birds info on wild turkeys.

YR J F M A M J J A S O N D
15     · · · · · · · · ·  
14     · · · · · · · · ·  
13     · · · · · · · · ·  
12     · · · · · · · · ·  
11 · · · · · · · · · · ·  
10 · · · · · · · · · · · ·
09 · · · · · · · · · · · ·
08 · · · · · · · · · · · ·
07 · · · · · · · · · · · ·
06 · · · 3 · · · · · · · ·
05 · · · · · · · · · · · ·
04 · · · · · · · · · · · ·
03 · · · · · · · · · · · ·
02 · · · · · · · · · · · ·
01 · · ·             · · ·
Great blue heron
(Ardea herodias)
 ©Janet Allen Great blue heron

Every couple of years we look out the window to see this giant bird, attracted by our little pond. We don't have any fish to attract them, but I imagine our toads are at risk (though they aren't generally out during the day).

See Cornell's All About Birds info on great blue herons.

YR J F M A M J J A S O N D
15     · · · · · · · · ·  
14     · · · · · · · · ·  
13     · · · · · · · · ·  
12     · · · · · · · · ·  
11 · · · · · · · · · · ·  
10 · · · · · · · · · · · ·
09 · · · · 1 · · · · 1 · ·
08 · · · · · · · · 1 · · ·
07 · · · · · · · · · · · ·
06 · · · · · · · · · · · ·
05 · · · · · · · · · · · ·
04 · · · · · · · · · · · ·
03 · · · · · · · · · 1 · ·
02 · · · · · · · · · · · ·
01 · · ·             · · ·
Turkey vulture
(Cathartes aura)
 ©Janet Allen Turkey vulture

We've seen this very large bird gliding around the neighborhood looking for dead animals. Apparently they almost never attack living prey. We've never actually seen them land in our yard (the photo is the house across the street), but we've enjoyed watching them soar and glide around overhead.

See Cornell's All About Birds info on turkey vulture.

YR J F M A M J J A S O N D
15     · · · · · · · · ·  
14     · · · · · · · · ·  
13     · 2 · · · · · · ·  
12     · · · · · · 1 ·  
11 · · · · · · · · · · ·  
10 · · · · · · · · · · · ·
09 · · · · · · · · · · · ·
08 · · · · · · · · · · · ·
07 · · · · · · · · · · · ·
06 · · · · · · · · · · · ·
05 · · · · · · · · · · · ·
04 · · · · · · · · · · · ·
03 · · · · · · · · · · · ·
02 · · · · · · · · · · · ·
01 · · ·             · · ·
Sharp-shinned hawk
(Accipiter striatus)
 ©Janet Allen Sharpie

A sharpie (or is it a Cooper's?) used to be a fairly regular visitor throughout the year, though not every day. He isn't around as much anymore, but I suspect he's around more than I see him, though—probably all those times the yard is devoid of birds. Some people object to hawks because they kill other birds. (But are humans fit to pass judgment on this?) Although it's sad to see him grab a bird, this is part of the ecosystem and just what hawks eat. We have bushes for birds to escape to (and we're always rooting for him to get a house sparrow!)

See Cornell's All About Birds info on sharp-shinned hawk.

YR J F M A M J J A S O N D
15     · 1 · · 1 · 1 · ·  
14     1 · · 1 · 1 · · ·  
13     1 · · · · · · · ·  
12     · · · · 1 · 1 1 1  
11 1 1 · · · · · · · · ·  
10 1 1 · · · · · · · · · 1
09 1 1 · · · · · · · · 1 ·
08 1 1 1 1 1 · · 1 1 1 · 1
07 · 1 1 1 · 1 · 1 · 1 · 1
06 1 1 1 1 1 · · · 1 · · ·
05 1 1 1 · · · 1 1 · 1 1 1
04 1 1 1 1 · · · 1 · 1 1 1
03 1 · 1 · · · · 1 · 1 1 1
02 1 · · · · · · · · 1 1 ·
01 1 1 1             · 1 1
Rock pigeon
(Columba livia)
 ©Janet Allen Rock pigeon

Fortunately pigeons haven't come into our yard the last few years. This is odd because there's a flock of them that seems to live a few blocks over (in the photo), and we do offer corn grits at our feeder. Maybe they just don't like natural landscaping as much as conventional lawn and landscaping.

See Cornell's All About Birds info on pigeons.

YR J F M A M J J A S O N D
15     · · · · · · · · ·  
14     · · · · · · · · ·  
13     · · · · · · · · ·  
12     · · · · · · · · ·  
11 · · · · · · · · · · ·  
10 · · · · · · · · · · · ·
09 · · · · · · · · · · · ·
08 · · · · · · · · · · · ·
07 · 10 · 1 · · · · · · · ·
06 · · · · · · · · · · · ·
05 1 3 5 · · 2 · 1 2 3 · ·
04 · · · · 2 1 · · · · · ·
03 2 2 2 4 2 2 2 · · · · ·
02 · · · 1 · 3 2 2 · · · ·
01 · · ·             · · ·
Mourning Dove
(Zenaida macroura)
 ©Janet Allen Mourning dove

We love mourning doves, though we know not everyone does. Maybe it's because we rarely have more than two or three at a time. Their cluelessness is part of their charm. We enjoy watching them trying to figure out tasks such as how to get from one side of a fence to the other side. It doesn't seem to occur to them to fly over it. They seem to face a similar dilemma getting from the top of the hopper-style bird feeder to the perch.

See Cornell's All About Birds info on mourning doves.

YR J F M A M J J A S O N D
15     3 2 3 3 2 2 1 1 ·  
14     2 4 4 3 3 3 1 3 ·  
13     4 3 5 3 3 4 2 2 3  
12     2 4 3 3 3 2 1 2 2  
11 8 11 4 2 2 1 · 2 · 6 5  
10 16 15 5 5 4 2 3 · 2 1 3 4
09 9 3 6 4 3 3 3 4 2 4 5 9
08 16 15 7 5 5 5 7 4 3 5 5 7
07 5 8 7 9 3 6 3 2 3 2 6 13
06 7 7 6 3 4 3 3 3 4 3 7 9
05 3 4 4 6 4 7 7 5 7 6 4 9
04 10 7 17 5 4 8 2 4 1 5 7 7
03 17 5 5 7 5 6 5 3 6 4 4 7
02 2 5 6 7 9 7 4 5 4 3 3 15
01 6 1 5             1 1 ·
Ruby-throated hummingbird
(Archilochus colubris)
 ©Janet Allen Ruby-throated hummingbird

Of course, everyone loves hummingbirds. We try to provide as many natural food sources as possible, such as these jewelweeds. We provide a nectar feeder only very early in the season or very late.

See Cornell's All About Birds info on ruby-throated hummingbirds.

Citizen Science: Operation RubyThroat and Hummingbirds at Home

YR J F M A M J J A S O N D
15     · · 2 1 2 3 2 · ·  
14     · · · 1 2 2 1 · ·  
13     · · 1 1 2 2 1 · ·  
12     · · 1 1 2 2 1 · ·  
11 · · · · 1 1 · 2 · · ·  
10 · · · · 1 1 2 1 1 · · ·
09 · · · · · 1 2 2 1 · · ·
08 · · · · 1 1 2 2 1 · · ·
07 · · · · 2 1 1 1 2 · · ·
06 · · · · · 1 1 1 2 1 · ·
05 · · · · 1 1 2 2 3 1 · ·
04 · · · · 2 1 1 1 1 · · ·
03 · · · · 1 1 2 2 1 1 1 ·
02 · · · · 1 · 3 3 1 1 · ·
01 · · ·             · · ·
Red-bellied woodpecker
(Melanerpes carolinus)
 ©Janet Allen Red-bellied woodpecker

One of our favorites—a really handsome bird. Before we started studying bird books, we might have guessed this was a red-headed woodpecker, since the red on its head is more prominent than its slightly reddish belly.

See Cornell's All About Birds info on Red-bellied woodpecker.

YR J F M A M J J A S O N D
15     · 1 1 · · · · · 1  
14     1 · · 1 1 · 2 1 1  
13     1 1 1 · · · 1 1 1  
12     1 · · 1 · · 1 1 1  
11 1 1 1 1 1 · · · · 1 1  
10 1 1 1 1 1 · · · · · 1 1
09 1 1 · · · · · · · · 1 1
08 1 1 1 · · · · · · · 1 1
07 1 1 · · · · · · · · 1 1
06 · · · · · · · · · · 1 ·
05 1 1 · · 1 · · · · · · 1
04 · · · · · · · · · 1 1 1
03 1 · · · · · · · · · · 1
02 · · · · · · · · · · · ·
01 · · ·             · · ·